Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein

Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein came on aliya with his family in 1971 from New York. He studied at the Netiv Meir High School in Jerusalem, and thereafter, spent a year studying with the Rav zt"l. From 1979-1985, he did hesder at Yeshivat Har Etzion, serving in the Armored Corps. He received Semicha from the Rabbanut and a degree in English Literature from Hebrew University. Rav Mosheh has been a Ram in Yeshiva since 1992. While on sabbatical in Cleveland during the 97 and 98 academic years, Rav Mosheh served as Rosh Kollel of the Torat Tzion Kollel. He also taught at Bruria, an Advanced Program for Women in Jerusalem from 1992-1997. Rav Mosheh authored Moses: Envoy of God, Envoy of His People, and is currently writing a sefer on haftarot. At present, he serves as Shana Alef Ram, is responsible for the yeshiva’s Kollel Gavoha, and is teaching an advanced Gemara BeIyun shiur at the Beit Midrash for Women Migdal Oz. Harav Mosheh was inaugurated as Rosh Yeshiva in Tishrei 5769, alongside his father Harav Aharon Lichtenstein, Harav Yaakov Medan and Harav Baruch Gigi. He is married to Dr. Michal Lichtenstein and has three daughters.

Teacher Title Abstract Course
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Korach "And the Lord Your God is Your King" Themes and Ideas in the Haftora
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Chukat - The Right Man at the Wrong Time Themes and Ideas in the Haftora
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Balak: What Does the Lord Require of You Themes and Ideas in the Haftora
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein "And [Eliyahu] Stood in the Entrance of the Cave" The Recurring Deliberation between Eliyahu and God On Seclusion and Involvement In this shiur, we will study the haftara of Parashat Pinchas (I Melakhim 18:46-19:21), which describes the drama that plays out in Eliyahu's soul in response to Israel's impaired spiritual state. The story's plot revolves around Eliyahu's desire to withdraw from society out of jealousy for God, a process that reaches its climax when he encounters God at Chorev. What is the impetus for this story? Does Eliyahu change his position in the end? Themes and Ideas in the Haftora
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Pinchas: Yirmiyahu and Moshe - Two Models of Prophecy Themes and Ideas in the Haftora
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Matot- Masei: Complementary Reproaches Over the next two weeks, we will be reading two haftarot of doom that deal with Israel's abandonment of God, the first taken from the beginning of the book of Yirmiyahu and the second from the beginning of the book of Yeshayahu. Apart from the prophecies of consecration, these two haftarot constitute the opening prophecies of these books. We wish today to compare and contrast the two rebukes in the hope that this will shed light on these prophecies and allow us to better understand the causes of the destruction. Themes and Ideas in the Haftora
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Devarim: Shabbat Chazon Themes and Ideas in the Haftora
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Ekev: The Difference Between Nachamu and the Haftara for Parashat Ekev The haftara for Parashat Ekev (Yeshayahu 49:14-51:3) constitutes another link in the chain of prophecies of consolation, and is one of the longest among them. As we shall see, the prophet struggles with several issues, and presents the people with a variety of perspectives in response to and as a consolation for their tribulations, thus necessitating a more expansive treatment. Themes and Ideas in the Haftora
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Re'eh: "O You Afflicted, Tossed with Tempest, Not Comforted" Themes and Ideas in the Haftora
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Shoftim Themes and Ideas in the Haftora
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Ki Tetze Themes and Ideas in the Haftora
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Ki Tavo Themes and Ideas in the Haftora
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Nitzavim - Vayelekh Themes and Ideas in the Haftora
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein The First Day of Rosh Hashana Themes and Ideas in the Haftora
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein The Second Day of Rosh Hashana Themes and Ideas in the Haftora
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Shabbat Shuva The haftara “Shuva Yisrael” depicts repentance stemming from trouble and distress, as opposed to “Dirshu Hashem be-himatze’o,” which presents a superior form of repentance. Why, then, is “Shuva Yisrael” read between Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur? Themes and Ideas in the Haftora
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein VeZot HaBerakha Themes and Ideas in the Haftora
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Machar Chodesh Themes and Ideas in the Haftora
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein The War of Gog and Magog Themes and Ideas in the Haftora
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Vaetchanan: Shabbat Nachamu - "Comfort My People, Comfort Them" The custom of reading haftarot of consolation after Tisha Be-Av is widely documented by the Rishonim and continues to our very day. Themes and Ideas in the Haftora

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