Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein

Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein came on aliya with his family in 1971 from New York. He studied at the Netiv Meir High School in Jerusalem, and thereafter, spent a year studying with the Rav zt"l. From 1979-1985, he did hesder at Yeshivat Har Etzion, serving in the Armored Corps. He received Semicha from the Rabbanut and a degree in English Literature from Hebrew University. Rav Mosheh has been a Ram in Yeshiva since 1992. While on sabbatical in Cleveland during the 97 and 98 academic years, Rav Mosheh served as Rosh Kollel of the Torat Tzion Kollel. He also taught at Bruria, an Advanced Program for Women in Jerusalem from 1992-1997. Rav Mosheh authored Moses: Envoy of God, Envoy of His People, and is currently writing a sefer on haftarot. At present, he serves as Shana Alef Ram, is responsible for the yeshiva’s Kollel Gavoha, and is teaching an advanced Gemara BeIyun shiur at the Beit Midrash for Women Migdal Oz. Harav Mosheh was inaugurated as Rosh Yeshiva in Tishrei 5769, alongside his father Harav Aharon Lichtenstein, Harav Yaakov Medan and Harav Baruch Gigi. He is married to Dr. Michal Lichtenstein and has three daughters.

Teacher Title Abstract Course
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein The Tzitz and Divine Truth Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein A Jewish Esthetic Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein THE HAFTARA OF TETZAVEH While we may think that the main element in the Mishkan and the Mikdash is the ark in the Holy of Holies, this haftara focuses on the importance of the altar. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Moshe's Leadership Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Megillat Esther and Our Educational Dilemma Megillat Esther concerns not just relations between Jews and non-Jews, but also relations between Jews themselves. What does it teach us today? Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Eliyahu and Ovadia – Contrasting Attitudes towards Involvement with the Jewish People In this week's haftara we encounter the two radically different attitudes of Eliyahu and Ovadyahu - the former isolating himself from the sinful nation and the latter remaining involved with them, even when it entailed compromising his principles. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Eliyahu and Ovadyahu – Contrasting Attitudes Toward the Jewish People The haftara of Ki Tisa presents the famous story of Eliyahu upon Mount Carmel, but the little-known figure of Ovadyahu is a hero in his own right -- in some ways, greater than Avraham. What does this tell us about the episode of the Golden Calf in the day's Torah reading? Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein “That There Be No Plague among Them When You Number Them” The question of relating to a mass of people vs. relating to an individual comes to a head in this week's parasha, when the Jewish people are counted in a census. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein The Haftara of Ki Tisa The haftara of Parashat Ki Tisa (Melakhim I 18:1-39) recounts one of the most famous stories in the Early Prophets – the prophet Eliyahu's contest with the prophets of Ba'al on Mount Carmel. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Exile and Redemption Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Why Were the People Involved in Building the Mishkan? Our parasha emphasizes that the Jewish people were heavily involved in donating to and building the Mishkan. Why is this so important? We shall explore three reasons. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein The Haftara of Vayakhel The haftara for Parashat Vayakhel (according to Sephardic custom, Melakhim I 7:13-39; according to Ashkenazic custom, Melakhim I 7:40-50) is yet another entry in the series of haftarot taken from the chapters of Melakhim dealing with Shlomo's Temple. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein The Haftara of Pekudei The haftara for Parashat Pekudei (I Melakhim 7:51-8:21) is the last haftara in the series of haftarot connected to the Temple. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Shaul and Amalek The haftara for Parashat Zakhor deals with two issues: first, the mitzva of wiping out Amalek and our attitude toward it; and second, the personal tragedy of Shaul, king of Israel, and his failure of leadership. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein "I Have Formed You; You Are My Own Servant" Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein The Great and Dreadful Day of the Lord The annual calendar of the haftarot is very influenced by the holidays and appointed times of Israel, so that even where the Torah reading follows its ordinary course, the haftara may ignore the parasha and occupy itself with the spiritual situation dictated by the calendar. The haftara for Shabbat Ha-gadol, like the three haftarot of calamity and the seven haftarot of consolation, which are read during the summer months, is one of the clearest examples of this phenomenon. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein On Sin and Redemption Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Take Courage! The Ramban offers two reasons for Aharon's hesitation to approach the altar, and both reasons give us great insight into religious life. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Renewal of the Covenant and the Question of the Nesi'ut The starting point of the haftara for Parashat ha-Chodesh, like that of many other haftarot, is subject to a difference in custom between Ashkenazim and Sefardim. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein “If a Woman Has Conceived Seed” The mitzva of circumcision relates to man within the context of the animal world but also above it. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Relationship between Man and Beast We often fail to notice that the opening passage of Parashat Tazria discusses some of the most remarkable kindnesses that God does for humanity. The miracles of conception and birth, as well as the mitzva of circumcision, are points that are worth considering. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Purity and Impurity Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein “You Shall Be Holy” This week's parasha helps us answer the question: How are we to infuse our lives with holiness? Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Two Paths to Repentance What is the spiritual significance of tzara'at? Why does the Torah spend so much time talking about it, and what can we learn from it about repentance? Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein “Thus Shall He Come Into the Holy Place” Parshat Acharei Mot opens with instructions to Aharon regarding the proper manner in which he may enter the Holy of Holies. In this shiur, we will attempt to understand why these directions were so important, given the deaths of Nadav and Avihu in Parshat Shemini. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva

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