Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein

Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein came on aliya with his family in 1971 from New York. He studied at the Netiv Meir High School in Jerusalem, and thereafter, spent a year studying with the Rav zt"l. From 1979-1985, he did hesder at Yeshivat Har Etzion, serving in the Armored Corps. He received Semicha from the Rabbanut and a degree in English Literature from Hebrew University. Rav Mosheh has been a Ram in Yeshiva since 1992. While on sabbatical in Cleveland during the 97 and 98 academic years, Rav Mosheh served as Rosh Kollel of the Torat Tzion Kollel. He also taught at Bruria, an Advanced Program for Women in Jerusalem from 1992-1997. Rav Mosheh authored Moses: Envoy of God, Envoy of His People, and is currently writing a sefer on haftarot. At present, he serves as Shana Alef Ram, is responsible for the yeshiva’s Kollel Gavoha, and is teaching an advanced Gemara BeIyun shiur at the Beit Midrash for Women Migdal Oz. Harav Mosheh was inaugurated as Rosh Yeshiva in Tishrei 5769, alongside his father Harav Aharon Lichtenstein, Harav Yaakov Medan and Harav Baruch Gigi. He is married to Dr. Michal Lichtenstein and has three daughters.

Teacher Title Abstract Course
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Sorcerers and Prophets While a sorcerer tries to "use" God to achieve his own will, a prophet attempts to accomplish God's will. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein “And Speak to the Rock Before Their Eyes” In this sicha, we will consider the events of Mei Meriva in light of the Netziv's explanation regarding the purpose of the events of the final year in the desert. Based on this, we will attempt to draw lessons from this story. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein What Does the Lord Require of You? The haftara for Parashat Balak (Mikha 5:6-6:8) introduces us to a new prophet whom we have not previously encountered, and he is the last prophet to join the list of prophets from whose prophecies the haftarot are taken. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Yirmiyahu and Moshe - Two Models of Prophecy Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein The Leadership of Moshe Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein “In Place of Your Fathers Shall Be Your Children”: The Philosophical Principles of Inheritance Parashat Pinchas addresses the concepts of inheritance and the portion of the firstborn, which are fleshed out in chapter Yesh Nochalin in Bava Batra. What are the philosophical underpinnings of the concept of inheritance? Why does the Torah deem the transmission of physical property to be so important? Why does the firstborn receive an extra portion and what does Tanakh tell us about firstborns? And how does all this relate to our connection with God? Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Sensitivity towards Human Life At the end of his life Moshe is commanded to take God’s revenge upon Midian and to establish three cities of refuge on the eastern side of the Jordan. What these both have in common is that they emphasize the need to be sensitive to human life, even under seemingly difficult circumstances. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Complementary Reproaches Over the next two weeks, we will be reading two haftarot of doom that deal with Israel's abandonment of God, the first taken from the beginning of the book of Yirmiyahu and the second from the beginning of the book of Yeshayahu. Apart from the prophecies of consecration, these two haftarot constitute the opening prophecies of these books. We wish today to compare and contrast the two rebukes in the hope that this will shed light on these prophecies and allow us to better understand the causes of the destruction. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Shabbat Chazon The haftarot read on the festivals and other special days are spelled out in detail at the end of tractate Megilla (31b). That list includes two haftarot taken from Yeshayahu 1. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein The Unifying Principles of the Laws of Ki Tetze Parashat Ki Tetze contains the largest number of mitzvot of any parasha in the entire Torah. Seemingly, it is a collection of diverse laws that for whatever reason are not included in other parashot in the Torah – either Mishpatim, with its monetary laws, or Shoftim, with its guidelines as to communal administration. However, I shall attempt here to present a general explanation for the connection between the laws in the parasha. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein "Arise, Shine; for Your Light is Come, and the Glory of the Lord is Risen upon You" Regarding the seven haftarot of consolation, Tosafot state (Megilla 31b, s.v. Rosh Chodesh): "It is the way of consolations to be increasingly consoling." This position forces us to see this week's haftara (the sixth in the series of seven) as prophesying about grand acts of deliverance and consolation. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein The First Covenant and the Second Covenant The gemara cites the view of R. Akiva, who maintains that three covenants were made between God and the people of Israel. Why was there a need for three covenants? What was the unique role of the third covenant in the Plains of Moav? Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein The Jubilee Vision The Roshei Yeshiva and Rosh Beit Midrash share their dreams for the future of Yeshivat Har Etzion and Beit Midrash for Women Migdal Oz. Sichot Roshei Yeshiva
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Two Groups of Plagues: The Difference Between Vaera and Bo The Exodus and Moshe
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein The Haftara for Simchat Torah (1): From Moshe to Yehoshua The Holiday of Sukkot
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein The Haftara for Simchat Torah (2): "You Shall Meditate Therein Day and Night" The Holiday of Sukkot
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein The War of God and Magog: The Haftara of Shabbat Chol Ha-moed Sukkot The Holiday of Sukkot
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Publicizing the Miracle and the Covenant of Chanuka Is publicizing the miracle the exclusive indispensable element in the mitzva of Chanuka candles; is lighting next to the door merely the best way to perform the mitzva? The Meaning of Chanuka
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Chanuka Candles and the Menora in the Mikdash A comparison of the Chanuka candles to the menora in the Mikdash sheds light not only on the dual nature of the mitzva of lighting but on the dual nature of Chanuka. The Meaning of Chanuka
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein "Your Time for Love Has Arrived" Each year, as we read the magnificent love story of Shir Ha-shirim, we encounter the sacred flames of passion between the Jewish people and the Almighty expressed in the work. Whose heart wouldn't be stirred by the depiction of the Dod (male lover), symbolizing God, knocking at his beloved's door, begging her to let him in, or by the riveting drama of the Re'aya (female lover) - the Jewish people - returning to her beloved as the mutual bonds of affection are restored? The Meaning of Pesach
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Purim: Holiday of Covenant and Salvation The Meaning of Purim
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein The Haftara of Shabbat Zakhor: Shaul and Amalek The Meaning of Purim
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein Chana's Distress and Remembrance: The Haftara of the First Day of Rosh Hashana The haftara for the first day of Rosh Hashana (I Shemuel 1:1-2:10) is the account of God's remembering Chana, allowing her to have a child – which according to Chazal (Rosh Hashana 11a) took place on Rosh Hashana) – and Chana's prayer in the wake of Shemuel's birth and weaning. Each of these factors is a good and sufficient reason to read this haftara on Rosh Hashana, though the primary factor seems to be God's remembering of Chana, as argued by Rashi, and this will be the focus of our study. The Meaning of Rosh Hashana
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein "For I am a Father to Israel, and Efrayim is My Firstborn" The Meaning of Rosh Hashana
Harav Mosheh Lichtenstein The Nature of Prayer on Rosh Ha-shana, Fast Days and Times of War The Meaning of Rosh Hashana

Pages