The History of the Divine Service
מרצה Title תקציר סידרה
Rav Yitzchak Levy LECTURE 192: THE HISTORY OF THE DIVINE SERVICE ON ALTARS (I) From this shiur on, we will discuss the history of the divine service on altars. We will try to understand the role of the altar in each period and the nature of the service conducted on it. Later, we will also address the phenomenon of bamot and examine the relationship between them and the altar. History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy LECTURE 193: THE HISTORY OF THE DIVINE SERVICE ON ALTARS (II) In the previous lecture, we reviewed the history of worship on altars with respect to Adam, Kayin, Hevel, and Noach. We will now consider this issue with respect to the patriarchs. History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy LECTURE 194: THE HISTORY OF THE DIVINE SERVICE AT ALTARS (III) We will open this week's shiur by completing the survey that we began last week of the altars built by Avraham. History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy LECTURE 195: THE HISTORY OF THE DIVINE SERVICE AT ALTARS (IV) After the altars built by the patriarchs and the sacrifices offered by Yaakov, there is no reference in the book of Bereishit to the building of additional altars in Eretz Yisrael. The next time we hear of the building of an altar it is the altar of Moshe at Refidim. That altar is the subject of this week's shiur. History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy The History of the Divine Service at Altars (V) Following Moshe's building of the altar in Refidim, which we discussed in the previous shiur, the people of Israel continued on to Mount Sinai. At the end of Parashat Yitro, after the giving of the Torah on the mountain, the Torah issues commandments and establishes rules regarding the building of an altar of earth and stones, after which it continues with Parashat Mishpatim. History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy Lecture 197: The History of the Divine Service at Altars (VI) – The Covenant at the Foot of Mount Sinai In our previous shiur, we began to examine the erection of the altar and the twelve pillars at the foot of Mount Sinai, as described at the end of Parashat Mishpatim. We discussed the relationship between the site of the altar and the site of Moshe's breaking of the first set of the tablets, as well as the ramifications of this issue with respect to the sanctity of Mount Sinai. History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy The History of the Divine Service at Altars (VI) – The Covenant at the Foot of Mount Sinai (II) Over the course of the coming year, we will continue to survey the history of the Divine service at altars. We will then focus on the structure of the altar in the Mishkan and in the Mikdash, and we will discuss the significance of this vessel among the other Temple vessels. History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy Lecture 199: The History of the Divine Service at Altars (VI) – The Covenant at the Foot of Mount Sinai (III) In this shiur, we will discuss one particular element of the covenant made at the foot of Mount Sinai – the sprinkling of the blood. This act takes place twice over the course of the making of the covenant: once on the altar and once on the people. We will explore the various meanings assigned to these acts within the framework of the making of the covenant, and we will also try to clarify precisely upon whom the blood was sprinkled. History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy Lecture 200: The History of the Divine Service at Altars (VI) – The Covenant at the Foot of Mount Sinai (IV) In this shiur, we will discuss the identity of the "young men of Israel" who offered sacrifices at the foot of Mount Sinai. We will then consider the question of how and at what stage the sacrificial service was transferred from the firstborns to the priests. History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy Lecture 201: The History of the Divine Service at Altars (VI) – The Covenant at the Foot of Mount Sinai (v) In this shiur, we will examine the details of the service at the foot of Mount Sinai and argue that the nature of that service parallels and is even identical in many details to the service in the Mishkan. Thus, it can be said that in a certain sense, the Mishkan had already been erected at the assembly at Mount Sinai described in detail in the parshiot of Yitro and Mishpatim, and that the covenant entered into at the foot of Mount Sinai was an essential part of that phenomenon. History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy Lecture 202: The History of the Divine Service at Altars (XI) Part 6 The Covenant at the Foot of Mount Sinai: In the previous shiur, we brought several proofs of a direct link between the assembly and covenant at Mount Sinai, on the one hand, and the Mishkan, on the other. In this shiur, we will adduce additional evidence to the connection between them and discuss the meaning of that connection. History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy LECTURE 203: THE HISTORY OF THE DIVINE SERVICE AT ALTARS (XII) – THE PROHIBITION OF BAMOT (I) LECTURE 203: THE HISTORY OF THE DIVINE SERVICE AT ALTARS (XII) – THE PROHIBITION OF BAMOT (I) History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy Lecture 204: The History of the Divine Service at Altars (XIII) – The History of slaughtering non-consecrated animals and eating meat In the previous shiur, we began our discussion of the prohibition of bamot and related to the situation prior to the Mishkan and to the erection of the Mishkan. In the wake of the Torah's account in Vayikra 17, we began to examine the Torah's attitude toward the slaughter of non-consecrated animals after the erection of the Mishkan, and we brought three reasons for the prohibition of slaughtering non-consecrated animals in the wilderness. History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy Lecture 205: The History of the Divine Service at Altars (XIV) – The History of Slaughtering Non-consecrated Animals and Eating Meat (II) When was man granted permission to eat meat? In the previous shiur, we saw that according to several commentators, man was permitted to eat meat from the very beginning of creation. In this shiur, we will consider the dominant view found in Chazal and the Rishonim, according to which permission to eat meat was granted only in the aftermath of the flood. Why was meat initially prohibited and why was it permitted in the time of Noach? History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy Lecture 206: The History of the Divine Service at Altars (XV) – The History of Slaughtering Non-consecrated Animals and Eating Meat (III) After having dealt with the question of why meat was initially forbidden for human consumption, we will now address the issue of why meat was later permitted in the aftermath of the flood. History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy Lecture 207: The History of the Divine Service at Altars (XVI) – The History of Slaughtering Non-consecrated Animals and Eating Meat (IV) In this shiur, we will continue to explore the possibility that the allowance to eat meat stems from man's higher status relative to animals. We will attempt to explain what happened after the flood that led to the allowance. History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy Lecture 208: The History of the Divine Service at Altars (XVII) – The History of Slaughtering Non-consecrated Animals and Eating Meat (V) In the last two shiurim, we examined the opinions that maintain that an allowance was granted to eat meat because of a change in reality following the flood or because of man's superior standing in relation to animals. In this shiur, we will consider the position according to which the allowance to eat meat symbolizes the spiritual fall of man in the wake of the sins that led to the flood. History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy Lecture 209: The History of the Divine Service at Altars (XIX) – The History of Slaughtering Non-consecrated Animals and Eating Meat (VII) In this shiur, we continue our study of the reason for the prohibition of eating the fats and blood of animals. History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy Lecture 210: The History of the Divine Service at Altars (XX) – The History of Slaughtering Non-consecrated Animals and Eating Meat (VIII) In recent shiurim, we discussed different aspects of the prohibition against eating blood. In this shiur, we will relate to the obligation to cover the blood, as presented in the continuation of Vayikra 17. History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy Lecture 211: The History of the Divine Service at Altars (XXI) – The History of Slaughtering Non-consecrated Animals and Eating Meat (IX) Having concluded our examination of the issue of covering blood in the Bible and in the words of Chazal, in this shiur, we will consider the various reasons that have been offered for the Torah obligation to cover the blood of a slaughtered animal. History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy Lecture #212: The History of the Divine Service at Altars (XXII) – The History of Slaughtering Non-consecrated Animals and Eating Meat (X) In this shiur, we will continue to discuss the obligation to cover the blood of slaughtered undomesticated animals and birds. Why is there a distinction between domesticated and undomesticated animals in this context? History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy LECTURE 213: THE HISTORY OF THE DIVINE SERVICE AT ALTARS (XXIII) – THE HISTORY OF SLAUGHTERING NON-CONSECRATED ANIMALS AND EATING MEAT (XI) In this shiur, we will consider the prohibition of eating blood as it appears in Devarim 17, in particular the obligation to "spill it on the ground like water." History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy Lecture #214: The History of the Divine Service at Altars (XXIII) – The History of Slaughtering Non-consecrated Animals and Eating Meat (XII) In this shiur, we will summarize what we have learned over the course of the last number of shiurim regarding the history of the prohibition/permission to eat meat, as well as the prohibition of eating blood and the obligation to cover the blood of slaughtered animals. History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy Lecture #215: The History of the Divine Service at Altars (XXV) – The Prohibition of Bamot [Private Altars] (II) In this shiur, we return to our discussion of the prohibition of the bamot, focusing on the different presentations of this prohibition in Vayikra and Devarim. History of the Divine Service
Rav Yitzchak Levy Lecture #216: The History of the Divine Service at Altars (XXVI) – The Prohibition of Bamot (III) In this shiur, we continue our discussion of the prohibition of sacrificing on bamot, private altars. Specifically, we discuss the determining factor in the permission of bamot. When was it permissible historically to sacrifice outside of the Mishkan? History of the Divine Service

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