A River Goes Out of Eden
מרצה Title תקציר סידרה
Rav Uriel Eitam A River Goes Out of Eden - Introduction In this introductory shiur, we consider the goal of this series: to gain a deeper understanding of the Jewish holiday cycle through the story of the Garden of Eden. While the connection to Rosh Hashana is obvious, the other holidays of Tishrei also reflect the nuances of the Eden experience, upon deeper analysis. “A River Goes Out of Eden”
Rav Uriel Eitam Shiur #01: Malkhuyot - The Nature of the Connection Renewed on Rosh Hashana The identity of Rosh Hashana is somewhat mysterious in the Torah, but its position in rabbinic literature as day of creation and day of judgment links it firmly to the story of Adam in the Garden of Eden. “A River Goes Out of Eden”
Rav Uriel Eitam Shiur #02: Zikhronot, The Remembrance Blessing: The Covenant of the Akeida and the Repair of Adam’s Sin The story of the Binding of Yitzchak, an essential focal point of Rosh Hashana, contains many allusions to the story of Eden. Avraham's dedication to God rectifies the sin of the forebears of humanity, Adam and Chava. “A River Goes Out of Eden”
Rav Uriel Eitam Shiur #03: Shofarot: Tekiot Di-myushav, Tekiot Di-meumad and the Confusion of Satan The two series of shofar sounds, sitting and standing, reflect the two directions of communication between man and God. Together, they serve to repair the relationship ruined by the sin in the Garden of Eden. “A River Goes Out of Eden”
Rav Uriel Eitam Shiur #04: The Atonement that Purifies – Part I: The Unique Service of Yom Kippur While Yom Kippur's name identifies it as the Day of Atonement, the Torah also speaks of a purification process on the day. What does purity have to do with atonement, and what role does offering sacrifices play in each? “A River Goes Out of Eden”
Rav Uriel Eitam Shiur #05: The Atonement that Purifies: The Unique Service of Yom Kippur Part II As we continue to consider the connections between Yom Kippur and the Garden of Eden, we consider the role of the Jewish people in addressing the sin of Adam and Chava, as well as the unique repentance of Yom Kippur. “A River Goes Out of Eden”
Rav Uriel Eitam Shiur #06: The Service of the Goats Part I: Repair of the Sin Involving the Tree of Knowledge The special service of Yom Kippur, with two goats that look the same but experience very different fates, reflects the unique role of the day and its conceptualization of sin. “A River Goes Out of Eden”
Rav Uriel Eitam Shiur #07: The Service of the Goats Part II Repairing the Sin of Eating From the Tree of Knowledge Sending the goat to Azazel on Yom Kippur reflects a deeper act of purification, with echoes of the Garden of Eden. The people of Israel have a subtle but vital role to play in the process. “A River Goes Out of Eden”
Rav Uriel Eitam Shiur #08: The Five Types of Affliction Part I: The Yom Kippur Service of All of Israel Yom Kippur is the only fast day ordained by the Torah. What is the significance of the fact, and how does it connect to the sin of Adam and Chava? “A River Goes Out of Eden”
Rav Uriel Eitam Shiur #09: The Five Types of Affliction Part II: The Yom Kippur Service of All of Israel What significance do the five afflictions of Yom Kippur have in relation to the sacrificial service of the day? How do they embody the repair of the sin of Adam and Chava? “A River Goes Out of Eden”
Rav Uriel Eitam Shiur #10: The Holiday of Sukkot Part I - Remaining in the Garden of Eden Sukkot seems to be the festival of nature and of water, yet rain on the holiday is considered a sign of God's disapproval. What does this mean, and what does it have to do with the origins of precipitation in the Creation narrative? “A River Goes Out of Eden”
Rav Uriel Eitam Shiur #11: The Holiday of Sukkot Part II Remaining in the Garden of Eden What is the significance of when and how we celebrate Sukkot? What does this tell us about connecting to God as in the Garden of Eden? “A River Goes Out of Eden”
Rav Uriel Eitam Shiur #12: The Holiday of Sukkot Part III Arba Minim I Repairing the Plant World The unique way in which the Four Species are presented--in the Torah, in the Mishna and in Halakha--reflects their special role in tapping into the spiritual side of the harvest season. “A River Goes Out of Eden”
Rav Uriel Eitam Shiur #13: The Holiday of Sukkot Part IV Arba Minim II Repairing the Plant World The four species taken on Sukkot symbolize a rectification of the sin of the first humans in the Garden of Eden, putting eating into the proper spiritual context. “A River Goes Out of Eden”
Rav Uriel Eitam Shiur #14: The Holiday of Sukkot Part V Arba Minim III Repairing the Plant World What is so special about the etrog, and why do some of the Sages identify it with the object of Adam and Chava's sin? “A River Goes Out of Eden”